The Challenges of Managing Change Effectively

One of the significant improvements with ITIL v3, way back in 2007, was recognition of the need to move the change authorisation window further up the lifecycle. No longer, we thought, would change authorisation be sought when the development work had been completed and operational running was imminent. No longer would changes be “thrown over the wall” giving service operation scant notice – virtually blackmailing them into accepting the change.

Some progress has undoubtedly been made. Most customers tell me that operational acceptance is a key part of their change management process. But it still appears that change management is not considered until major investment of resources to design, build and test the change have already been committed.

Consider, if you would, what the core volumes say about the change proposal. It describes it as: “A document that includes a high-level description of a potential service introduction or significant change, along with a corresponding business case and an expected implementation schedule. Change proposals are normally created by the service portfolio management process and are passed to change management (i.e. the CAB) for authorisation. Change management will review the potential impact on other services, on shared resources, and on the overall change schedule. Once the change has been authorised, service portfolio management will charter the service.

Wouldn’t our services be managed more effectively if all major changes were reviewed and authorised at this stage. Consider the impact on the authority and reach of the change advisory board.

The reasons cited above all others for the failure of changes is lack of planning; lack of appreciation of the complexity; inadequate timescales; and inadequate budget for the change. How much better would we handle these matters if due consideration to change was given early enough?

Our purpose in service management is to facilitate change; to allow our organisations to adapt to changing business drivers speedily and effectively. We also have a duty to ensure that changes are implemented smoothly; without any detrimental impact on the business – i.e. get them right first time. Proper and timely scrutiny of change proposals will go a long way to achieving our objectives.

Stuart Sawle
http://www.sysop.co.uk

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